University Support

 
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Since our inception in 2012, we have proudly facilitated support of the following initiatives, thanks to the generosity of our alumni & friends:

 

In addition, AFSOAS is proud to have provided support to other global charitable organizations over the years, including:

Médecins Sans Frontières (2017)
Rebuilding Alliance - Palestine (2016)
Migrant Offshore Aid Station - Malta (2015)


Endangered Languages Documentation Programme - Ghana (2019)

In 2019, we committed to providing scholarships for 2 individuals from Ghana to attend an intensive language documentation training program in Fall 2019 hosted by the Endangered Languages Documentation Programme at SOAS. These 2 bright young people will help to document endangered cultural practices and everyday language use among the Animere, a Ghana-Togo Mountain group who live in Keichebi and Kunda in the Nkwanta district of the Oti region of Ghana. Congratulations to Ida Sodoke Assem and Kenneth Bodua-Mango, and thanks to all the donors who helped make this possible.

Ida Sodoke Assem holds an M.Phil in Applied Linguistics from the University of Education, Winneba, Ghana (2017), and a BA (Akan) from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana. She conducted her undergraduate and masters research on the pragmatics of the Akan language. Ida works as a part-time field researcher for Associates for Change (AFC), an NGO in Accra, and has so far served on two of their major field works in 2017 and 2019. She is also an Assistant Lecturer in Communication Studies at the University of Professional Studies (UPSA), Accra. She is passionate about the use of language in context and plans to pursue a PhD in linguistics with a particular focus on documenting endangered cultural practices and everyday language use among the Animere, a Ghana-Togo Mountain group who live in Keichebi and Kunda in the Nkwanta district of the Oti region of Ghana.

Ida Sodoke Assem holds an M.Phil in Applied Linguistics from the University of Education, Winneba, Ghana (2017), and a BA (Akan) from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana. She conducted her undergraduate and masters research on the pragmatics of the Akan language. Ida works as a part-time field researcher for Associates for Change (AFC), an NGO in Accra, and has so far served on two of their major field works in 2017 and 2019. She is also an Assistant Lecturer in Communication Studies at the University of Professional Studies (UPSA), Accra. She is passionate about the use of language in context and plans to pursue a PhD in linguistics with a particular focus on documenting endangered cultural practices and everyday language use among the Animere, a Ghana-Togo Mountain group who live in Keichebi and Kunda in the Nkwanta district of the Oti region of Ghana.

Kenneth Bodua-Mango graduated from the University of Ghana, Legon in 2009 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Linguistics. He did a mandatory one-year national service as a teaching and research assistant at the Department of Linguistics, University of Ghana, Legon. In 2010, he won a scholarship from the Norwegian Government under the quota scheme to pursue an MPhil programme in Linguistics at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim and graduated in 2012. As part of the requirements for the MPhil programme in Linguistics at NTNU, he wrote a corpus-based thesis on Coordinators in Safaliba; a Gur (Mabia) language spoken in the Savanah Region of Ghana. From September 2015 to October 2018, he worked as an Assistant lecturer at the Department of Gur-Gonja Education, University of Education Winneba, teaching General Linguistics and Gonja. Bodua-Mango Kenneth is currently a part-time Tutor in Language and Linguistics at the Accra College of Education. He intends to pursue a PhD at the University of Ghana, Legon, (from the 2019-2020 academic year) focusing on the documentation of Animere, a highly endangered Ghana-Togo Mountain, Kwa (Niger-Congo) language, spoken in towns like Kecheibi and Kunda in the Nkwanta district of the Oti region of Ghana.

Kenneth Bodua-Mango graduated from the University of Ghana, Legon in 2009 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Linguistics. He did a mandatory one-year national service as a teaching and research assistant at the Department of Linguistics, University of Ghana, Legon. In 2010, he won a scholarship from the Norwegian Government under the quota scheme to pursue an MPhil programme in Linguistics at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim and graduated in 2012. As part of the requirements for the MPhil programme in Linguistics at NTNU, he wrote a corpus-based thesis on Coordinators in Safaliba; a Gur (Mabia) language spoken in the Savanah Region of Ghana. From September 2015 to October 2018, he worked as an Assistant lecturer at the Department of Gur-Gonja Education, University of Education Winneba, teaching General Linguistics and Gonja. Bodua-Mango Kenneth is currently a part-time Tutor in Language and Linguistics at the Accra College of Education. He intends to pursue a PhD at the University of Ghana, Legon, (from the 2019-2020 academic year) focusing on the documentation of Animere, a highly endangered Ghana-Togo Mountain, Kwa (Niger-Congo) language, spoken in towns like Kecheibi and Kunda in the Nkwanta district of the Oti region of Ghana.